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Another Happy Customer!

Excellent service and great prices! Even with shipping, RockAuto saved me over $100 on the parts I needed for the repairs on my son's car. This is by far the best place for auto parts.

Bob in Arizona



Upcoming Events
If you would like your event featured here e-mail with details.

29th Annual British Bash
6/28/2014
Louisville, KY
e-mail

James Dean "Spring" Run
6/28/2014
Fairmont, IN
e-mail

Keith Peterson Memorial Car Show
6/28/2014
Fort Gratiot Township, MI
e-mail

5th Annual Dave Gill Chevy Summer Show
6/28/2014
Columbus, OH
e-mail

Annual King Mountain Car Show
6/29/2014
Moore, ID
e-mail

Rancho Cucamonga Firefighters Benefit Car Show
6/29/2014
Rancho Cucamonga, CA
e-mail

New Ulm Autofest Car Show Club Cruise
6/29/2014
New Ulm, MN
e-mail

Jesse Kitchens Memorial TSA Scholarship Car Show
6/29/2014
Parker, CO
e-mail

Walla Walla Historical Auto Club Independence & Old Iron 4th of July Tour
7/4/2014
Walla Walla, WA
e-mail

Under the Sun Car Show
7/4/2014
Tucson, AZ
e-mail

Central Mississippi Car Show
7/4/2014
Lena, MS
e-mail

Annual July Car Show & Parade
7/5/2014
Laurel, MD
e-mail

Dallas Mopar Club Bluegrass on Ballard
7/5/2014
Wylie, NY
e-mail

O'Town 5th of July Block Party
7/5/2014
O'Fallon, IL
e-mail

5th Annual Home Run Car Show
7/5/2014
Frederick, MD
e-mail

Crossfires' Across America #5 7/7/2014
Rifle, CO
e-mail

Blast from the Past 2014 Car Show
7/14/2014
Gloucester, VA
e-mail

31st Annual Fiat FreakOut National Convention
7/10/2014
St. Charles, IL
e-mail

KYB Suspension Kits

See what we have from KYB

RockAuto is now offering KYB Shocks and Struts in a convenient kit. These kits include two KYB shocks or struts as well as two mounts and/or bellows. Following the "Info" Info link next to the part number will show you a full list of the components included with each specific kit.

Why should you install new mounts and bellows when replacing shocks or struts? Worn mounts can cause increased road noise and harsh vibrations, while cracks or tears in old bellows can allow dirt and water to enter, damaging your new struts.

Benefits of purchasing a kit:

  • Lengthen strut/shock life by keeping dirt and other contaminants out
  • Reduce road noise and vibration transmitted through the suspension
  • Save time by having the parts at hand to perform a more complete service, better ensuring success now and preventing problems down the road
  • Install matched parts, designed to work together to meet or exceed OE performance
Image is of a typical kit; part appearance and contents vary by application.

2005 Toyota Corolla, 1999 BMW 328I, 2012 Chevrolet Silverado...whatever you drive, chances are you can find the KYB “Strut & Mount Kit” and/or “Shock Absorber & Mount Kit” you need in the “Suspension” category of the RockAuto catalog!






Forum of the Month

Ford Expedition Forum

Ford Expedition Forum is devoted to all things Ford Expedition. You will find topics relating specifically to the 1st, 2nd or 3rd generation Expedition or general topics regarding the interior, exterior, suspension, electrical and so much more! With over 15,000 members contributing to discussions, if you have a question another member is bound to have your answer.

Whether you have advice to give, need technical help, or just want to show off your ride, join the Ford Expedition Forum. Join for free today and become a part of a forum driven by enthusiasts!




If you are the administrator or member of a forum and you would like to see your website featured in an upcoming newsletter and receive a discount code to share with your members, contact cynthia@rockauto.com.





Repair Mistakes & Blunders

Ouch!

The first car that I rebuilt was a 1959 Ford Galaxie Fairlane 500 in 1983, when I was in high school.  I drove the car frequently, but, could only go short distances as it would overheat all the time.  I tried EVERYTHING but could not fix it: changed thermostats, tried no thermostat, changed hoses, verified that the cylinder heads and block weren't clogged up, etc.

I finally had to sell it about 18 months after I finished restoring it as I could not drive it anymore.  Fast forward to 1986 or 1987.  I had a 1978 Chevy Camaro Z-28.  The fan failed on it so I swapped it out for a new one. When I was installing the fan, I realized that when I had installed the fan on my beloved Ford Galaxie, I had installed it backwards!  It was blowing air on the radiator instead of pulling air through it, thus leading to the overheating! 

I never should have sold the Galaxie.

Bill in New Jersey

Tell us about your most infamous auto repair blunder or unconventional fix. Use your woe to help others avoid similar mistakes or share off-the-wall solutions that worked (at least for a while!). Please e-mail your story to flamur@rockauto.com. Include your mailing address and if you would like a RockAuto T-Shirt (please let us know your shirt size) or Hat if we publish your story. See the T-Shirts and Hats under Tools & Universal Parts in the catalog. The story will be credited using only your first name and your vague geographic location (state, province, country, continent, etc.) so you can remain semi-anonymous!






Automotive Trivia

Automotive Trivia

Which brand of spark plugs were original equipment on Ford cars in the 1960s?

A. Autolite
B. Champion
C. Motorcraft


Answer below






Rust Pressure

RockAuto

I wrote in the Early February newsletter about replacing both the brake calipers on my family’s 1992 Dodge B250 van after the old caliper pistons repeatedly seized up and failed to release pressure on the brake pads. A kind reader wrote to suggest that I should also check to make sure none of the van’s brake lines were being squeezed by rust.

Since my youth spent in Detroit attempting to hold a rusty 1977 Dodge together with Bondo, I tend to think of rust as something that weakens steel and turns it to dust. However, rust has another way to cause mischief. As the reader pointed out, rust bubbles can extend outward from the base metal and take up more space than the original metal did. Layers of rust built up on a brake hose bracket or other brake fitting can actually push hard enough on a brake hose to impede the flow of brake fluid. Hydraulic pressure may still activate the brake pads, but once the brake pedal is released, a brake hose squeezed by rust restricts the release of brake fluid pressure. The brake pads stay pressed against the brake rotor, causing heat, wear, drop in fuel economy, steering pulling to one side or other problems.

I checked the brackets supporting the brake lines on my Dodge van and did not find significant rust build up. A good wire brushing and fresh paint can restore some brake hardware. Brake hydraulic hoses compressed by rust may have lost their shape and need to be replaced.

Brackets supporting the brake lines on my Dodge van

A master mechanic and shop owner recently told me another place to watch for rust exerting pressure is the lug nuts. Some original equipment lug nuts are steel clad with a layer of chromed metal. Rust builds up on the inner lug nut and slightly bulges out the chrome cladding. Maybe the next time a tire goes flat, the vehicle owner discovers the lug nut wrench no longer fits the lug nuts because they are swollen with rust. In the RockAuto catalog, find new brake lines under "Brake/Wheel Hub" and new lug nuts, including locking lug nuts, under "Wheel/Tire".

Tom Taylor,
RockAuto.com


To read more of Tom's articles, click this link and choose from story titles on the Newsletter Archives page.






Adam's 1978 Toyota Corolla

Adam's 1978 Toyota Corolla

I recently bought a voltage regulator for my 1978 Toyota Corolla from RockAuto. Not only is it the first part I purchased from RockAuto, it's also the first part I've purchased for the car, ever. This car is the "Liftback" edition, with a 1.6-liter 4-cylinder engine, a 5-speed manual transmission and rear-wheel-drive.

My aunt bought the car brand new in Holyoke, MA, and brought it with her when she moved to California a few years later. She lived in different parts of California over the years. She was in Oakland at the time of the 1989 San Francisco earthquake (the car survived). When she and her husband moved to Oregon, the Toyota went with them.

Living in Portland, my aunt continued to drive the Toyota daily. She tells me she hadn't intended to keep the car so long, but reasoned that, "when the cost of maintaining it exceeds the cost of making payments on a new car, then I'll get rid of it." That day never came, as she lived close to a mechanic who specialized in Japanese cars and kept the Toyota well maintained. She continued driving the car daily until the summer of 2009, when she gave it to me.

Under the condition of "if you come get it, you can have it," my father and I flew to Oregon and drove the Toyota home to New Hampshire. A month later I began my last year of high school, and I too drove the car daily. Except in the winter when I would shoehorn the Toyota into the garage to preserve it from snow and salt. Over the next few years this became a routine. I would drive a beater car in the winter and pull the Toyota out of storage in the spring.

A couple of years ago, I decided it was time to get the car painted. The paint was in pretty rough shape, so I took off the doors, hood, hatch, windshield, grille, fenders, gaskets, etc., and sanded all the old paint off. Then a bodyman friend of ours painted it silver, piece-by-piece. The original color had been silver, but this new paint is just a bit shinier, a silver used on 2005 Toyota Tacoma trucks.

I put the Toyota back together last summer and have now been driving it (still daily) since Easter. The only trouble it's ever given me occurred a few weeks ago, when I discovered that my six-year-old battery was overcharging. One new battery, the aforementioned voltage regulator, and everything is working again!

This is the most reliable car I've ever owned, and at 36 years old, it shows no signs of slowing down! It's still a daily driver seven or eight months of the year, and I frequently make 100-plus mile trips in it. The gas mileage is about 32 MPG highway, so it's often the most efficient choice for a long drive. It's amazing to me that this car still exists, especially since it's lived its whole life as an ordinary daily driven car. But thanks to regular maintenance and Portland's mild winters, it's still around to enjoy.

Thank you,
Adam in New Hampshire



Share Your Hard Work

Do you purchase parts from RockAuto? If so, RockAuto would like to give you the opportunity to have your car or truck possibly featured in one (or occasionally more) of our publications such as the monthly newsletter, collector magnets or RockAuto social media. New, old, import, domestic, daily driver, trailer queen, classic, antique, we want to see them all! Please e-mail flamur@rockauto.com with your vehicle's history, interesting details, your favorite images and what parts from RockAuto you have used.






Let RockAuto Help

Let RockAuto Help

Are you organizing a car show or other auto related event? From goody bag stuffers to gift certificates...we can help. We can even publicize your event in our newsletter.

Just send an e-mail to marketing@rockauto.com with information about your show.






Automotive Trivia Answer

Automotive Trivia

Which brand of spark plugs were original equipment on Ford cars in the 1960s?

Answer: A. Autolite (Ford bought Autolite in the early '60s and sold it in the early '70s when it switched to promoting the Motorcraft brand. Autolite is presently part of FRAM Group IP LLC.) 
B. Champion
C. Motorcraft



Back up to trivia question




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