rockauto.com
RockAuto April Newsletter
Go to the RockAuto Catalog

Another Happy Customer!
Another Happy Customer!

I'm keeping the four vehicles in my family fleet running with parts from RockAuto.

The catalog is awesome! It's great to see options for the same part from different manufacturers, along with RockAuto's organization of parts into "economy", "daily driver", etc. categories.

David in Texas


Upcoming Events
Upcoming Events

Need goody bag items and a gift certificate for your show? RockAuto can help! Email marketing@rockauto.com for more information.

25 Miata's at Myrtle Beach 2019
Myrtle Beach, SC Email
Apr
27 GYS Band Car Show
Ontario, CA Email
Apr
27 13th Annual "Karz for Kidz" Car & Truck Show
Fayetteville, NC Email
Apr
27 Jaguar Owners Assoc. Annual Concours d'Elegance
Dallas, TX Email
Apr
28 Autos For Autism
Wichita, KS Email
Apr
28 21st Annual River Cruise-In
Ft. Pierce, FL Email
Apr
28 2nd Annual Bombshell Betty's Car Show
Palmdale, CA Email
Apr
2 Lone Star Toyota Jamboree
Gilmer, TX Email
May
4 Cruisin for a Cure
Roanoke Rapids, NC Email
May
4 Rockwood Summit High School Car Show
Fenton, MO Email
May
4 Connorís Car Show
Keller, TX Email
May
4 Hope Train Day Car Show
Hope, AR Email
May
5 Mass Firebirds Spring Kickoff Cruise
Spencer, MA Email
May
5 Annual Drive Away Breast Cancer Car Show
Safety Harbor, FL Email
May
5 Nismo Fiesta
San Antonio, TX Email
May
5 41st Annual General Motors on Display
Macungie, PA Email
May
11 Carthage Buggy Festival Car Show
Carthage, NC Email
May
11 55th Annual Pioneer Auto Club Car Show
Kokomo, IN Email
May
11 2019 Bald Knob Homefest Car Show
Bald Knob, AR Email
May
12 7th Annual Cruise For The Cure
Boonsboro, MD Email
May
13 Great Smoky Mountain Trail Ride
Oliver Springs, TN Email
May
17 Spring Willys Reunion
Aurora, OH Email
May
17 Chicks In The Sticks
Seymour, MO Email
May
18 Clark Lumber 11th Annual Car Show
Tigard, OR Email
May
18 Volvos at Carlisle
Carlisle, PA Email
May
18 Kimberly High School Car Show
Kimberly, WI Email
May
UAC A/C Compressor & Component Kits
See what we have from UAC

With warmer temperatures finally on the way, now is the time to get your air conditioning system operating in peak condition. The RockAuto.com catalog offers A/C parts from respected manufacturers including UAC. Founded in 1988, UAC is known for high quality standards and for constantly developing new parts. From A/C Compressors to A/C Condensers to A/C Evaporator Cores and all of the A/C Refrigerant Hoses and components in-between, UAC produces the A/C parts you need and RockAuto.com provides them at the reliably low prices you expect. (Still snowing in your area? RockAuto has a huge selection of Heater Cores by UAC too!)

In addition to individual components, UAC has two different types of A/C Compressor & Component Kits to ensure you have all of the parts to successfully complete the job. Their Compressor Replacement Kit includes the A/C Compressor, O-Ring Kit, A/C Refrigerant Oil, and the additional components for your specific vehicle such as the A/C Expansion Valve, A/C Receiver Drier/Accumulator and/or the Orifice Tube. Their Compressor-Condenser Replacement Kit includes an A/C Condenser in addition to the components mentioned above.

UAC  A/C Compressor & Component Kits
Typical UAC A/C Compressor & Component Kits

Manufacturers recommend that the condenser be replaced whenever the compressor is replaced. While older Tube & Fin style condensers can technically be flushed, metal shards from a failed compressor can get lodged in the cylindrical tubes and restrict refrigerant flow, diminishing the heat transfer capabilities of the condenser and A/C system. Newer style, mini-tube condensers cannot be flushed and should always be replaced along with the compressor.

Find these kits and other UAC parts for your specific car or truck in the "Heat & Air Conditioning" category of the RockAuto.com catalog.

Chemours A/C Refrigerant
See what we have from Chemours
Chemours A/C Refrigerant

RockAuto is excited to announce the addition of Chemours A/C Refrigerants to our catalog. Chemours brings over 85 years of history and proven leadership in refrigerant science and pioneered much of the technology that makes air conditioning and refrigeration possible today.

RockAuto offers their Freon™ 134a, Freon™ 134a Plus UV Leak Detect, and Opteon™ YF (HFO-1234yf) in 12 oz. cans.

Freon™ 134a is the non-ozone depleting HFC refrigerant that replaced R-12 (commonly known as simply "Freon") in the early '90s. It is the standard automotive refrigerant used in most late-model vehicles and can also be used to retrofit older R-12 automotive/mobile air conditioning systems. Freon™ 134a Plus UV Leak Detect adds bright UV dye. The dye can reveal leaks years after installation, is compatible with A/C system materials and works with existing UV or blue light lamps.

Opteon™ YF (HFO-1234yf) represents the future of A/C refrigerants. Many major car manufacturers have already begun using HFO-1234yf in their new models. Opteon™ YF cools like 134a but with a lower global warming potential. The breakthrough Opteon™ chemistry retains other important properties, including comparable capacity and energy efficiency, low toxicity, and zero ozone depletion potential. Opteon™ YF (HFO-1234yf) cannot be used to retrofit older A/C systems.

Find the Chemours A/C Refrigerant for your specific car or truck in the "Heat & Air Conditioning" category of the RockAuto.com catalog. We also list all three refrigerants under "Fluid/Chemical" in the "Heat & Air Conditioning" category of the Tools & Universal Parts tab.

Forum of the Month

Do you have a question about 1982-1992 Chevrolet Camaros or Pontiac Firebirds? ThirdGen.org is a website where topics range from general chit-chat to discussions on the most involved custom fabrication and repairs.

If you are the administrator or member of a forum and you would like to see your website featured in an upcoming newsletter and receive a discount code to share with your members, contact marketing@rockauto.com.

Repair Mistakes & Blunders
Repair Mistakes & Blunders

When I was around 17, my girlfriend drove a Ford Tempo. Her parents would have the car serviced at a local oil change place and would spend about $30 or so for an oil change. I thought that was an absurd amount of money, and I told them I could do it myself for much cheaper.

So I went home and got my tools, then proceeded to drain the oil, but when I tried to remove the filter, it just spun about a quarter turn and stopped. I remember my dad telling me that stabbing a screwdriver through the filter can gain you leverage. I did that, and the filter only spun about an 1/8 of a turn more...all the while it was being torn apart by the twisting action of the screwdriver. I went and got a strap wrench and tried that. This filter still would not move. My girlfriend's parents were starting to worry that the oil change shop had damaged the engine as the filter was so difficult to remove.

Eventually a friend showed up, and in just a few seconds, was able to easily remove what was left of the oil filter! It was then I realized I was turning it the wrong way! I made him swear that he would not tell my girlfriend's parents as he walked away laughing. Lesson learned.

Rob in Florida

Tell us about your most infamous auto repair blunder or unconventional fix. Use your woe to help others avoid similar mistakes or share off-the-wall solutions that worked (at least for a while!). Please email your story to flamur@rockauto.com. Include your mailing address and if you would like a RockAuto T-Shirt (please let us know your shirt size) or Hat if we publish your story. See the T-Shirts and Hats under Tools & Universal Parts in the catalog. The story will be credited using only your first name and your vague geographic location (state, province, country, continent, etc.) so you can remain semi-anonymous!

Automotive Trivia
Automotive Trivia

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, all the jobs listed below, except for one, will face a similar percentage change in number of people employed by 2026 in the US (compared to 2016). What one job below has a future employment forecast that is different than the others?

A. Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics
B. Computer Programmers/Coders
C. Truck Drivers (Heavy Trucks)
D. Police and Detectives

Answer below

Neglected Floating Brake Rotors
Tom's Story

Police cars face severe duty; so does the family sedan when a teenager wielding a learners permit is sitting in the drivers seat. My daughter will spend an hour laboriously practicing pulling into parking spots. This slow crawl gives the brakes, power steering pump, radiator fan circuit and other parts a workout. It also reminded me to check the condition of our trusty '93 Ford Tempo's brakes.

I remembered replacing the car's brake pads "not that long ago." After logging into my RockAuto customer account (go to the upper right corner on RockAuto.com), I discovered I had last bought new brake pads in 2011; nearly eight years and 50,000 miles (80,000 km) ago.

Back in 2011, I just slapped on new brake pads and did not replace the brake rotors. The good news is that incomplete brake job helped create a set of nasty brake rotors that demonstrate problems that can build up over time and miles.

Floating brake rotors like the Tempo's are common on most newer vehicles. They are not held on with dedicated fasteners. The brake rotor simply slides onto the lug studs and is sandwiched between the wheel hub and the wheel. The brake caliper keeps the brake rotor from falling off when the wheel is removed. If you take off the caliper to replace the brake pads, then the rotor is ready to slip off for machining or replacement.

The wheel, brake rotor, hub, caliper and brake pads form a system. If any part in the system has problems then there are symptoms such as brake squeal or "warped brake rotor" vibrations. The last couple of winters, my wife commented that the Ford's brakes were less likely to emit the occasional chirp after I installed or uninstalled the snow tires. The system is in fragile condition if slight variations in a wheel's position on the hub and/or the tightness of the lug nuts influences brake noise.

Neglected Floating Brake Rotors
The Ford's old brake rotors

The Ford's old brake rotors have a ridge of rust built up on the outer edge. Some minor grooves and dimpling on rotor surfaces can be acceptable, but these rotors have major undulations, grooves and rust divots. Any of these flaws can cause noise and/or accelerated brake pad wear. It is surprising that the brakes on this car were not noisier. I installed ceramic brake pads in 2011 and maybe that helped. The ceramic brake pads were also worn surprisingly evenly in spite of the ramshackle rotor surfaces.

Rust build-up between the wheel hub and brake rotor can cause vibrations often attributed to a "warped rotor." Even a Tempo's brake rotors are sturdy hunks of steel that would be difficult to bend with a blow torch. Adding a layer of rust to the hub, brake rotor and wheel sandwich is what throws everything out of alignment and causes vibration. The rust between this Ford's brake rotors and hubs was relatively minor. I had not noticed any vibrations, but after installing new brake rotors and brake pads the car did feel better/newer at 70 mph (112 kph).

My daughter has only been taking drivers ed classes for a month so I imagine I will be installing more new parts soon. Hopefully, they will continue to only be neglected maintenance parts!

Tom Taylor,
RockAuto.com

To read more of Toms articles, click this link and choose from story titles on the Newsletter Archives page.

Bob's 1981 Toyota SR5 4x4 Pickup
Bob's 1981 Toyota SR5 4x4 Pickup

This is my 1981 Toyota SR5 4x4 Pickup I bought in 1990 for $1000. It had a connecting rod sticking through the block, but it was a California vehicle with no rust and no dents. I rebuilt the 22R engine, 5-speed transmission and transfer case and drove it everyday until retirement in 2008 when we moved to Arizona. I am now 70 and still drive it daily.

I recently replaced some worn-out items and rebuilt the rear differential, front end, brakes, carburetor, water pump, belts, and hoses using parts from RockAuto. The venerable 22R engine has over 315,000 miles, and I will need to rebuild the engine, transmission and transfer case again using RockAuto parts. This vehicle will be passed down to my grandson.

Thanks RockAuto for great customer service and quality parts!
Bob in Arizona

Share Your Hard Work
Do you purchase parts from RockAuto? If so, RockAuto would like to give you the opportunity to have your car or truck possibly featured in one (or occasionally more) of our publications such as the monthly newsletter, collector magnets, RockAuto social media or other commercial use. New, old, import, domestic, daily driver, trailer queen, classic, antique, we want to see them all! Please email flamur@RockAuto.com with your vehicles history, interesting details, your favorite images (tips for taking pictures of your car) and what parts from RockAuto you have used.

Automotive Trivia Answer
Automotive Trivia

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, all the jobs listed below, except for one, will face a similar percentage change in number of people employed by 2026 in the US (compared to 2016). What one job below has a future employment forecast that is different than the others?

A. Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics
Answer: B. Computer Programmers/Coders (You may have chosen the right answer for the wrong reason. The number of computer programmers/coders employed in the US is predicted to DECLINE by 7% as more work is moved overseas. The other three job categories are expected to employ at least 6% MORE people by 2026.)
C. Truck Drivers (Heavy Trucks)
D. Police and Detectives

Back up to trivia question